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Toy Horse

Toy Horse

If everything goes as planned, nothing will go as planned!

(via tumb801)

Love em’ ged. Love em.

(via tumb801)

Stay up all night in the desert with the Em’s Restaurant staff. It’s great meeting new people and doing crazy things.

Stay up all night in the desert with the Em’s Restaurant staff. It’s great meeting new people and doing crazy things.

Could I have a glass of water to help wash this pride down?

Sam gave this to me for my birthday. The wrapping paper was very nice as well. Cheers to friends who know exactly what you’d like.

If we would all realize that we are antagonists sometimes, relationships would be a lot easier.

cinephiliabeyond:

On the set of A Woman Under the Influence. Photography by Brian Hamill & Sam Shaw.

John Cassavetes was inspired to write A Woman Under the Influence when wife Gena Rowlands expressed a desire to appear in a play about the difficulties faced by contemporary women. His completed script was so intense and emotional she knew she would be unable to perform it eight times a week, so he decided to adapt it for the screen. When he tried to raise funding for the project, he was told, “No one wants to see a crazy, middle-aged dame.” Lacking studio financing, Cassavetes mortgaged his house and borrowed from family and friends, one of whom was Peter Falk, who liked the screenplay so much he invested $500,000 in the project. The crew consisted of professionals and students from the American Film Institute, where Cassavetes was serving as the first “filmmaker in residence” at their Center for Advanced Film Studies. Working with a limited budget forced him to shoot scenes in a real house near Hollywood Boulevard, and Rowlands was responsible for her own hairstyling and makeup.

Upon completion of the film, Cassavetes was unable to find a distributor, so he personally called theater owners and asked them to run the film. According to college student Jeff Lipsky, who was hired to help distribute the film, “It was the first time in the history of motion pictures that an independent film was distributed without the use of a nationwide system of sub-distributors.” It was booked into art houses and shown on college campuses, where Cassavetes and Falk discussed it with the audience. It was shown at the San Sebastián Film Festival, where Rowlands was named Best Actress and Cassavetes won the Silver Shell Award for Best Director, and the New York Film Festival, where it captured the attention of film critics like Rex Reed. When Richard Dreyfuss appeared on The Mike Douglas Show with Peter Falk, he described the film as “the most incredible, disturbing, scary, brilliant, dark, sad, depressing movie” and added, “I went crazy. I went home and vomited,” which prompted curious audiences to seek out the film capable of making Dreyfuss ill.

A script is a series of words strung together. When I first start writing there’s a sense of discovery. In some way it’s not working, it’s finding some romance in the lives of people. You get fascinated with their lives. If they stay with you then you want to do something — make it into a movie, put it on in some way. It was that which propelled us to keep on working at it. Making a film is a mystery. If I knew anything about men and women to begin with, I wouldn’t make it, because it would bore me. I really feel that the script is written by what you can get out of it and how much it means to you, and if it means nothing to you, we start again and try to put ourselves up and communicate with you. The idea of taking a laborer and having him married to a wife who he can’t capture, is really exciting. I don’t know how you work on that. So I write – I’ll do it any way [I can]. I’ll hammer it out, I’ll kick it out, I’ll beat it to death, anyway you can get it. I don’t think there are any rules. The only rules are that you do the best you can. And when you’re not doing the best you can, then you don’t like yourself. And that’s very individual with everyone.John Cassavetes, chapter on The Making of A Woman Under the Influence

It’s a great privilege to read John Cassavetes’ (rare and hard to get) screenplay for A Woman Under the Influence [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only). Thanks to nickpaulwhite and the great folks at Write to Reel. The DVD/Blu-ray of the film is available at the Criterion Collection and the British Film Institute (BFI).

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

cinephiliabeyond:

Hands of Bresson, a visual essay on the tactile world of Robert Bresson created for the Criterion Collection by kogonada. Music: Schubert, Piano Sonata No. 20, D. 959 (used in Bresson’s Au Hasard Balthazar ).

A singular, iconoclastic artist and philosopher, Bresson illuminates the history of cinema with a spiritual yet socially incisive body of work. Famously dubbed a “transcendental” filmmaker (along with Yasujiro Ozu and Carl Dreyer) by Paul Schrader, Bresson is notable for continually refining the strict precision of his style—abolishing psychology, professional actors, and ornate camera work, and instead concentrating on the rigid movements of his “models” (as he called his actors) and the anguished solitude of his martyred characters. While the alternately tender and brutal allegory Au hasard Balthazar  is widely considered Bresson’s masterpiece, he had a long, visionary career that began in the forties and ended in the eighties, and was full of consistently fine films—the period drama Les dames du bois de Boulogne, the ascetic character study Diary of a Country Priest, and the minimalist tragedies Pickpocket and  Mouchette among them.

Excerpts from Robert Bresson’s Notes on Cinematography :

  • Two kinds of  films: those which use the theater’s means (actors, direction, etc.) and wield the camera in order to reproduce : those which use the cinematog­rapher’s means and wield the camera in order to create
  • An appeal to the eye only makes the ear impatient: the ear appealed to alone makes the eye impatient. Use these impatiences. The cinematog­rapher’s strength applies adjustably to two senses
  • Changing your lens constantly is like changing your glasses constantly
  • With the centuries the theater has become bourgeois. The cinema (photographed theater) shows to what extent
  • No absolute value to an image. Sound and image owe their value and  their power only to the use you put them to
  • In the mixture of true and false, the true makes the false stand out, the false prevents belief in the true. An actor simulates fear of a shipwreck, on a bridge of a real ship buffeted by a real storm, and we believe neither the actor nor the ship, nor the storm

A small, powerful book of significant thoughts on filmmaking: Robert Bressons’ Notes on Cinematography [pdf]. (NOTE: Out-of-print, for educational purposes only).

Bresson left us with a concise number of important films, as well as a rather simple and beautiful book of aphorisms ostensibly about the act of shooting a film, but perhaps about more than just that. Notes on Cinematography is curt and unflinching, filled with morality and at times uncomfortably extremist in it’s proposed methodology. Not surprisingly, when one watches a Bresson picture one immediately realizes that in Notes on Cinematography the man was deadly serious. And why wouldn’t a man of integrity have acted any other way. I have given Notes on Cinematography to the people I care about the most. The people who truly love film, love art and love life for all the right reasons. Please do the same.ForestForTheTrees

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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